The Comfort Zone

John: I think it’s worth continuing the discussion from yesterday (see Full of Myself) because it’s such a fundamental and important topic. What we are delving into is the constant battle we face, as humans, to let go of our personal expectations – our vision of how things should be – and to see life as it really is, in all of its multifaceted outplay.

So to recap the dream images, the best way I can describe them is that I would see something that was easy to define, easy to look at, and then I would consider how those images left me feeling. The simple images may have allowed me to feel safe, in the sense that nothing was being challenged, yet at the same time they left me feeling stifled, never really knowing what was going on because they were too cut and dried.

Then I was also seeing images in which there were three, four, five – who knows how many – possibilities and combinations, and with those I couldn’t feel comfortable. I couldn’t dumb them down to fit my worldview.

And it was the more complex images that, when accepted by me, enabled me to take something into account in a greater way. They were all intertwined, and I understood that they had to be intertwined, rather than minimizing them in order for me to feel more comfortable with myself.

In being forced to accept the multiplicity of images, knowing that they all fit and had something to do with what was really going on, I saw myself developing an ability to see the greater truth that is always available to us. I had a sense of the past, the present, and the future – especially in terms of what was designed to unfold.

We human beings cannot easily sit by in situations that confront us with circumstances that seem overwhelming. We can’t help but try to control the situation, or make choices, in ways that soothe our sense of wellbeing; when we do that, we deny things (information) that we don’t understand.

When we feel that sense of being overwhelmed, or that feeling of discomfort, we have one of two choices: we can either get away from it because it’s too chaotic to assimilate, or we can somehow allow ourselves to go with it and, in the process, gain access to a greater dimensionality.

Take, for example, our move to Las Vegas. It would be very easy to dismiss this city just because of its reputation and all that comes with it. Yet to do so would be to reject what is the underlying cause that has given this space in the desert an energy that is known worldwide.

The simple view would be to think that gambling and casinos are what give Las Vegas its energy – its pizzazz. But it’s really the fundamental energy of this place that allows it to happen. It’s unlikely that this city could have succeeded, in such a way, anywhere else.

So to dismiss it outright is to cut us off from the underlying energy that gives it life. A more complex view would say that there’s something more deeply significant going on here that draws people from around the world.

Examining these dreams has helped me to understand what it means to be more inclusive. In the simple dream images I felt some security, and dismissing Las Vegas as a place to live because of a simple view of it would have the same effect – I’d be closing myself off to the greater possibilities that brought us here in the first place.

So when we “bottom line” things that we encounter in life, we likely gain a fleeting sense of security – we risk less. In taking into account the multiplicity of life, we may feel momentarily confused, but in that scrambled condition we can develop the sight to perceive, and take in, and understand things that aren’t possible when we’re functioning only according to our own personal judgments and biases.

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